Should parents know better? Or is hockey becoming a “soft sport”?

Apr 4, 2014 by

SheaPenaltyBox31Dec2012The debate about aggression in hockey sparks some ongoing debates about what is just part of the game, and what pushes things too far. Should fighting be allowed? Should we be of the mentality “what happens on the ice stays on the ice”, sometimes meaning acts of aggression or violence that would be punishable by law off the ice are allowed on the ice all in the name of hockey?

Recently Josh Maguire of the Peterborough Petes, an Ontario Hockey League junior team, received a five game suspension for fighting (with an opponent who did not want to drop the gloves). This sparked hockey blogger Caitlin Campbell to write:

 “If you’re a parent or kid looking to sign up for hockey please know that the game of hockey, from it’s (sic) start is a physical game….if you don’t want a physical game then hockey isn’t your sport”.

Her original article is located here: http://frozenfutures.com/2014/04/03/josh-maguire-latest-victim-soft-sports/

Have a read of her post. Is hockey becoming a “soft sport”? Should parents who put their kids in hockey be prepared that it’s going to get rougher and tougher somewhere down the road, especially at higher competitive levels?

Read the article and then let us know what you think in the comments below or on our Facebook Page. Or email me at contactus@canadianhockeymoms.ca.

Until next time, happy hockey!

1 Comment

  1. Folks, the game of hockey has changed in many ways over the past 10-15 years and it will continue to change. As a former player and coach I see is that the main change is the respect factor-and this is were I feel in this instant has happened. Even as you say Cory, that Maguire was ‘trying to spark’ his team he needs a opponent who is willing to engage. If that opponent is not willing then he needs to find another. In the same breath here, Cory says you need to stand up and fight if called out, well I agree but you also have to be careful on who you are calling out. If it is a player that hardly fights then why do you call him out? What are you proving?
    I do agree though with Glen that it seems that these days the word going on in hockey is that it is to violent and concussions seems to go hand in hand with the game but we must remember that 10 to 15 years ago you played through that and didn’t say anything about having your ‘bell rung’ where now a days…well it is a society of ‘hyper-sensitivity’ – ‘child in a bubble’ syndrome and who is to be at fault on that?

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